22 Aug 2019

Imagine this: after months or years of hard work, you’ve been recognized by your boss and you’re being promoted to take the leading role on your team. You made it! That big effort is finally paying off! Now you can sit back and relax. All you will have to do is give orders, see the work flowing and see the results coming, right? Wrong! Let me tell you, my dear reader, that the hardest part is coming your way. I mean, yes, it’s cool you got the promotion and it’s great for your career. You probably deserve it, but it does have some down sides that come within the package that people don’t usually tell you. But don’t worry, I’m here to help you!

12 Jul 2019

In a previous post, I talked about a couple of examples of bad leadership and what we can learn from them. To close the circle, I want to elaborate on the same topic but from the other side of the court: some examples of harmful individual contributors I’ve encountered in my professional experience. As a disclaimer, I’m not going to talk about the typical case of a low performer on a team. That is a widespread situation for which, applying some specific strategies, you can manage and handle. I want to focus this more on a personality perspective.

01 Mar 2019

At some point during your professional life, you’ll probably encounter an exceptionally poor leader, boss or manager – someone you’ve worked for, or you’ve seen in a close team. I have, and it’s stressful and exhausting. I’ve seen some toxic leaders in other teams and watched that team reach a crisis point sooner or later. These bad leaders can make you feel like you hate your job, but the truth is you only hate them. As ridiculous as it may sound, bad leaders can be good for you. You might suffer under their command, but the experience will make you stronger. You can learn from what they are doing wrong. Like my mom says: “you are not useless, at least you are a bad example.”

18 Dec 2018

Being promoted from within to assume a leadership role on a team where you were once a member has a set of inherent challenges — many of the issues that you would encounter come from assumptions and not taking the opportunity to set expectations. If it is an outside hire, they will likely be more descriptive in their approach to taking charge as they need to assess several team characteristics of which you are already aware. Because things like communication, ways of working, culture, etc., need to be understood, there will be a need to define them and therefore setting the expectations of the new leader. I suggest you set your expectations early and assume nothing.

12 Nov 2018

The title may come off as a bit dramatic, so I’ll clarify what I mean. It’s impossible always to be professional. We have our personal lives and downtime. You shouldn’t keep up a business persona during all occasions. That sounds exhausting. What I am saying is to consider how you are perceived at three crucial points during your time with a company and the importance of being considered as consistently “professional.” Be mindful of the impression you make while interviewing for a company, while you are working for them, and when you leave. So, when we look at it this way, yes, always behave like a professional when dealing with potential, current, or former colleagues.

29 Oct 2018

Saying that the software development industry is hyper-competitive is an understatement. And, in this volatile marketplace, employers are perpetually looking for professionals with skills that are adaptable across multiple technologies, implementation methodologies, and frameworks. So, if your technical skills are strong, you shouldn’t have to worry about your professional development. Right? If you agree, you are only partially correct. In our experience, technical proficiency is not the only thing that matters for employers.